Literature, Literacy and Current Events

How mighty is the Mississippi?
How mighty is the Mississippi?

Oct. 19, 2018 - As the second longest river in North America, the Mississippi is mighty because of its length, width, speed, volume, watershed size, and economic impact. Metrics prove the Mississippi is mighty but it's also mighty beautiful, especially at sunset.

Word of the Day
delta: noun;the mouth or end of a river where it flows into a larger body of water; Find it in blue in today's top story!

Writing Practice

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Practice your writing skills with the story above!

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Complete this Writing Practice. Then print or email your document, or if available, save it to Google Drive.

Writing Progress

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Text Sets

How mighty is the Mississippi?How mighty is the Mississippi?
Oct. 19, 2018 - As the second longest river in North America, the Mississippi is mighty because of its length, width, speed, volume, watershed size, and economic impact. Metrics prove the Mississippi is mighty but it's also mighty beautiful, especially at sunset.

Weekly VOCAB

Week of October 15

altricial: adjective; for baby birds - needing to be fed by their parents;
Follow the flight of bluebirds

dormant: adjective; inactive;
It's National Trails Day!

epochal: adjective; life changing, significant, related to an epoch
Agreement signed at Singapore Summit

magnificent: adjective; wonderful, amazing;
Douglas Brinkley to students: Lead a dignified life (Parts 2 and 3)

Today In History

October 20

1803: Library of Congress: The Senate ratified the Louisiana Purchase Treaty by a vote of twenty-four to seven. The agreement, which provided for the purchase of the western half of the Mississippi River basin from France at a price of $15 million, or approximately four cents per acre, doubled the size of the country and paved the way for westward expansion beyond the Mississippi. Spain had controlled Louisiana and the strategic port of New Orleans with a relatively free hand since 1762. However, Spain signed the Treaty of San Ildefonso in 1800. News of the agreement eventually reached the U.S. government. President Thomas Jefferson feared that if Louisiana came under French control, American settlers living in the Mississippi River Valley would lose free access to the port of New Orleans. On April 18, 1802, Jefferson wrote a letter to Robert Livingston, the U.S. minister to France, warning that, "There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy.  It is New Orleans…"

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Questions

  1. How did Norman Borlaug save the lives of one billion people through his research and work in Mexico?
  2. How is the Norman Borlaug Heritage Foundation keeping the legacy of Norman Borlaug alive?
  3. What does it mean to "literally walk in the footsteps of Dr. Norman Borlaug?"

INSPIRE Day was an exciting, informative and educational field trip for students.

SNN Stories with less than 800 words.

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SNN Stories with less than 1000 words.

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Extra! Extra! Writing Practice Practice your writing skills by summarizing the information contained in the story at the left. What is the main point of the story? What are the key findings? Why is the story an important one? What are its implications? When finished, you can either print or email your document.
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